Fluoride

GENERAL INFORMATION
Some fluoride compounds, such as sodium fluoride, calcium fluoride, and fluorosilicates, dissolve easily into ground water as it moves through gaps and pore spaces between rocks. Most water supplies contain some naturally occurring fluoride. Fluoride also enters drinking water in discharge from fertilizer or aluminum factories. Also, many communities add fluoride to their drinking water to promote dental health.

HEALTH EFFECTS
If levels are below 0.7 ppm please consult your dentist or oral health care professional. Fluoride has both beneficial and potentially undesirable effects. At 2 ppm or below fluoride provides dental protection. However, some people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the MCL over many years could get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Fluoride in drinking water at half the MCL or more may cause mottling of children's teeth, usually in children less than nine years old. Mottling, also known as dental fluorosis, may include brown staining and/or pitting of the teeth, and occurs only in developing teeth before they erupt from the gums.

Standard value 1: 
4.00
Standard units 1: 
mg/L
Input units: 
mg/L
ug/L
ppm
ppb
Contaminant group: 
Standard type 1: 
MCL
Standard value 2: 
2.00
Standard units 2: 
mg/L
Standard type 2: 
SMCL
Action is recommended 2: 

SMCL ADVISORY - ACTION IS OPTIONAL
Fluoride levels were detected in your water sample to exceed the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL).

Action is optional 2: 

ACTION IS OPTIONAL
Fluoride levels were detected in your water sample but do not exceed the secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL). Nationally, the recommended optimum level of fluoride in drinking water has been a range of 0.7-1.2 ppm and in Ohio the recommended range has been 0.8-1.3 ppm. If levels are below the recommended optimum level of 0.7, as proposed by the US Department of Health and Human Services, contact your dentist or oral health care professional.

Typical range in Ohio: 
0.2 - 1.7
Major sources in drinking water: 
Erosion of earth materials; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories
Treatment options: 

TREATMENT OPTIONS
Home treatment methods to remove fluoride from drinking water include

  • reverse osmosis,
  • distillation,
  • anion exchange, or
  • activated alumina cartridges.

Fluoride removal in homes generally uses point-of-use devices with separate faucets installed at sinks used for drinking water.

Website resources: 

WEBSITE RESOURCES

Fact sheets: 

FACT SHEETS