Nutrient

  • GENERAL INFORMATION Chemical oxygen demand (COD) is an indicator test commonly used to indirectly measure the amount of organic compound pollutants in water. Most applications of COD determine the amount of organic pollutants found in surface water (e.g. lakes and rivers) or wastewater. Elevated COD levels can indicate surface water influences directly on groundwater.
  • GENERAL INFORMATION Nitrates (NO3) in drinking water usually originates from fertilizers or from animal or human wastes. Nitrate concentrations in water tend to be highest in areas of intensive agriculture or where there is a high density of septic systems. HEALTH ADVISORY Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.
  • HEALTH ADVISORY Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.
  • GENERAL INFORMATION Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen or TKN is defined as total organic nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen.  Nitrogen occurs in wastewater and ground water in several forms, including inorganic forms like nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), and ammonia (NH4), and organic nitrogen where the nitrogen is bound up in compounds with carbon, oxygen and hydrogen.  TKN is high in septic waste and manure.  Total nitrogen is equal to TKN plus nitrate and nitrite.
  • GENERAL INFORMATION Ammonia is rarely found in unpolluted surface water, but is common at low levels in well water.  Water contaminated with sewage, animal wastes or fertilizer runoff may contain elevated levels of ammonia.  Ammonia is very soluble in water.   Because of its solubility, excessive soil ammonia may penetrate into deeper soils and eventually reach groundwater. In some soils part of the ammonia may be converted to nitrates and nitrites before or after it reaches groundwater.    See nitrates for more information.
  • GENERAL INFORMATION Phosphorus is commonly found in soil, rocks and plants.  Phosphorus is an important fertilizer, but is also present in human and animal wastes, in sludges and in detergents. Phosphorus is relatively immobile in soil and will not reach groundwater except under certain conditions, such as transport from sewage treatment systems placed below the seasonal high water table and soils with low concentrations of iron, aluminum, and manganese.   
  • GENERAL INFORMATION